Updating the Man Box

by CrowMan514 on November 3, 2014 - 8:35pm

I think that the man box can be portrayed differently if there wasn’t the outs side of the box consequences. I don’t agree with all the different things that the inside of the man box contains but there are a few that should be taught to younger boys. In my opinion they should be courageous and should be able to be a leader, and in control. It’s just how we teach younger boys to become these male ideals. Violence is not a necessary way to show that one is strong or tough. Maybe if we showed that a tough man is not always physically fit, but should be taught that a real tough person is a person who is able to overcome his fears. I think that maybe some things should not be in the man box at all like intimidating, never shows weakness, macho, a player. These are all things that don’t belong in the man box but there are a few things that could help a younger boy to grow up with some character, how we teach him to be a man does include athletic, not because it's what the Adonis man should look like but because it’s a healthy life style. Or being respected is another that belongs in the box, a boy should grow up to be an man whom is respected by the people he knows and his colleagues, but that goes for both women and men, or rich, maybe rich is not the right word, maybe successful is the word  that we should be using. I think the man box is not all bad, I think it’s the people who educate the boys that are not properly teaching them. Maybe we should update the man box to the way we think men should behave. Men should be respected but also have respect for others, and solving problems with your fists is not an ideal way to solve anything at all, if anything it causes more problems. Men should have a fit physical form but then again both genders should do the same, it’s healthy, you can live longer, not because you should be able to beat up the other dude for something he did. I don’t think the man box is all bad, I think it’s the way some people perceive it that makes it into something bad.

http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men?language=en

Comments

I like the subject that you tackled with your article, as the “Man Box" seems to be taboo in our society from both the male and the female perspective. Unfortunately, I disagree with your idea that the Man Box needs updating. Rather, I believe that this concept should not be taught to children (not in schools, not in families, etc.), because it is a concept that gives the idea that men need to fit into certain criteria in order to be considered Men by their peers, their family, and their society. I especially disagree with the idea that we should teach men to be athletic because it is good for them, or that we should tell boys that they have to be leaders. It would mean that if a child were to be obese, not be the leader in his personal relationship, or demonstrate "weakness", or act in a way that the man box disagrees on, he would loose all aspects of his masculinity; For example, in my experience, I see at school that some boys/men do accept the idea of homosexuality, but don't ask them if a boy dresses nicely, because they'll either refuse to answer, or they'll answer, but end with the comment "no homo". I think that by modifying the man box, we are simply postponing the moment that we will HAVE to deal with the subject, and only creating new stereotypes as to what a man is. If we were to compare the issue of the Man Box to another one, like racism, it could be said that by telling children that there is no such thing as color, and that they should accept each other, and that saying that SOME of the stereotypes associated to certain races are false. Without changing COMPLETELY the way we think about race, we are only creating new stereotypes of race, without actually resolving the issue. In conclusion, even if your article does bring up the idea of changing the values and norms of manhood, the real way to solve the issue, is by taking away the idea that boys NEED to fit into criteria to fit the gender they wish to be.

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