The World’s Largest Humanitarian Crisis

by audreynoiseux on August 31, 2017 - 10:48am

Written by Shuaib Almosawa, Ben Hubbard and Troy Griggs, the article ‘It’s a Slow Death’: the World’s Worst Humanitarian Crisis”, published in the New York Times on the 23rd of August 2017, sums up the deadly collateral consequences of a war that seems to be never ending. In Yemen, the war has been lasting since the past two years and a half. The two parties, one led by the Saudi coalition and supported militarily by the Americans, and the other one, the Houthis and their allies, both affirm that they will never give up until the other side does. With the absence of a single proper government to control the country, many doctors, nurses and civil servants have not been paid for over a year. The ongoing bombings have destroyed the water wells throughout the country. The civilians are forced to drink contaminated water, therefore exposing themselves to cholera. The disease have infected over half a million of people in the last three months only, and killed about 2,000 civilians. “The United Nations has called the situations the world’s largest humanitarian crisis, with more than 10 million people who require immediate assistance. And the situation could become even worse.” 

 

The United Nations said that for this year only, the country needs $2.3 billion in humanitarian aid. As today, it has only received $964 million. As a simple individual, you can definitely send some money to worldwide known organizations such as Action Against Hunger, CARE, Doctors Without Borders or UNICEF. To increase your impact, you can also share what made you donate to Yemenis, on all your social medias. Let’s create a chain, and help save lives.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/08/23/world/middleeast/yemen-cholera-humanitarian-crisis.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fworld&action=click&contentCollection=world&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront

About the author

I recently took a year off to travel and volunteer, since then, my perspective of the world completely changed and so did I. I feel that I can now adapt to almost any situation, I enjoy meeting new people and am very easy going.