Rape and Release

by jam20 on October 3, 2016 - 11:51pm

Rape culture and sexual assault is a perennial issue which afflicts college campuses especially. This matter has been rapidly gaining attention due to the outbreak of rape victims who decided to go public with their personal experiences. A recent case which has received significant public scrutiny involves “Emily Doe,” a rape victim who courageously shared how sexual assault affected her. Brock Turner, a former Stanford attendant, raped an unconscious Emily Doe at a frat party. For his crime, he was only sentenced to 6 months of jail time. This verdict resulted with public outrage as many felt the punishment was disproportionate to the crime. The trial has been scrutinized over the unjust consideration of Brock’s position in society and how his privilege provided him with an advantage. It is also concerning that this assault has been illegitimized due to the fact that the victim was intoxicated. After powerful public criticism, an organization called change.org is petitioning a judicial recall of the trial. Other organizations such as the Stanford Association of Students for Sexual Assault Prevention, have been urging Stanford to reevaluate and enhance sexual assault policies.

Since 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted during their time on college campus it is important to understand the injustices of sexual assault. The Brock Turner case illustrates that a person’s position in society along with their privilege influences their judgement in a trial. In Brock Turner’s trail, the removal of his swimming scholarship was considered in his trial. Victim Emilie Doe argues that “how fast he swims does not lessen the impact of what happened to me.” If Brock weren’t a white Harvard attendant with exceptional swimming skills would he have received the same punishment? To answer this question, I predicted what the outcome would have been if Brock was a minority who was not attending a prestigious university. County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, claimed that a lengthy prison term “would have a severe impact on [Mr. Turner].”However, I believe that if Turner’s position in society was different, the impact of prison time would definitely not be considered in sentencing. Rape is arguably the most important issue afflicting college campuses. Since it adversely affects so many, it is essential that our society recognizes and speaks out on the injustices of sexual assault and how it is handled. If justice is not served it is our duty as citizens to do something about it because one day it could easily be one of your friends, your family members or even yourself who is affected by sexual assault.

Korn, M., & Jordan, M. (2016). Stanford University Sexual-Assault Case Prompts Backlash. Wall Street Journal, doi: http://www.wsj.com/articles/stanford-university-sexual-assault-case-prompts-backlash-1465343570

 

 

Comments

This is a very interesting and well thought out article. It is immediately apparent to me, as a reader, that you feel very passionately about this topic. Your title and opening sentences grab the readers attention. I agree with you that this is a topic that has been rapidly gaining more attention, especially in the media. As a woman, I feel very strongly about this subject and am glad people are starting to pay more attention to it, but it is sad that it is gaining attention with cases like Brock Turner's as it is not fair that he got such a light punishment for such a serious crime. One of the last points you made really caught my attention, the fact that had he been part of a minority, he most likely would have gotten a harsher sentence. In our class, we are looking at how privilege affects people of different "races" and I am sure that if you looked up similar cases involving a black man in Brock Turner's place, they would have been punished very differently. It is a good example of how privilege plays a part in our society even in parts of our societal system that are supposed to be just and fair.

The title of your article immediately caught my attention because rape culture is a very important issue and I think our society should be more aware of the problems regarding this issue. The Brock Turner case is a very good example of what is wrong with the justiciary system regarding sexual assault. I think it is outrageous that a crime that had this big of an impact on the victim had such a light punishment. I found it very interesting that you mentioned the fact that if Turner’s social status was different, his punishment would probably have been different. This case clearly shows that the justiciary system is biased with people’s social status and/or skin color. This point really made me think about this concept we learned in class about explicit and implicit racism. Those are both form of racism that refer to the utilization of one’s beliefs toward a specific racial group when making judgements. I think implicit racism is what was used here; and what is used in many justiciary cases, which means the beliefs are unconscious. These unconscious beliefs are often shaped by our society’s judgements towards a certain racial group. The only way to stop those beliefs is to promote awareness on equality. Hopefully one day people will truly pay for their acts but more importantly; that sexual assaults will decrease in number.

These three adjectives named in my title are what I would congratulate you on in your post. Being that I have a similar input on this issue as you, and that your title reeled me into the lecture of the latter, I have to say that it made me realize just how much the judicial system needs restructuring or to the least, some sort of self-realization that it is lacking actual justice.

The first time I read an article related to this issue, I remember thinking to myself "Brock Turner is not off the hook", meaning that I had the strong conviction that his sentence would reflect his actions, and that the consequences of the latter would follow him for the rest of his life. I was wrong. Not only did he receive an extremely lenient sentence, but he was also judged based on a principle called "white-privilege", being that he is a high-class, white-male star athlete on his swimming team at the very prestigious Stanford. I completely agree with you when you mention that, putting aside his gender and "race", Brock Turner would have probably obtained a much stronger punishment for his actions. What strikes me the most is that in similar cases, extremely different sentences were attributed to the guilty, never over-looking any aspects of the committed crime. The difference is that in the other case I am referring to, the defendant was a non-white male. Why weren't these other cases treated the same as Brock Turner's'? The answer is known from all, and truly disgusts me: Racism.

This brings me to associating white-privilege and what we defined as being racism in my own class. Racism can be formulated as being the abuse of power based on "racial characteristics" such as skin color, and I feel that this is exactly what happened in this case. As I read your post, as well as recalling the article I read previously that informed me of the trial, I came to the realization that Judge Aaron Perky treated Brock Turner's case differently, based on the fact that he is a white male, star athlete of the swimming team in a prestigious institution. This, is not only it white-privilege, but it's also implicit racism, which are unconscious beliefs, planted into people's minds because of several factors (i.e. parental comments, friends' comments, environment, education etc.). Of course, "race" is a social construct, however, societies perpetuate the idea that it exists biologically, which is why, sometimes, depending on the judge, sentences are lenient towards white people, just like in this case. However, it does not justify Judge Aaron Perky's decision, and CERTAINLY does not diminish Brock Turner's' acts.

To end on a more positive note, I would like to highlight once more how instructive your post is. It stays true to the events, although presenting your own view on the matter, portrays a clear image of what happened in this trial, and explicitly states the issue.

I wanted to read this article because of everything that is going on with rape culture, but mostly because of Brock Turner, so I was surprised when I realized that the post was about that situation. Many people, including me, are outraged in his sentence, I know that if it were me I would be devastated if my rapist got off that easy. My boyfriend bought me pepper spray when I started college, and it really does make me feel safer when I am on campus, especially at night.
Rape is not something that should be taken lightly, but that Judge completely disregarded the woman that was raped, and focused on the rapist, which I personally think is wrong. Most women are afraid to come forward with their sexual assault stories, so to have a woman come out and say something against hers is a huge deal. She even posted publically about her trial, which takes immense bravery. Letting your situation become scrutinized in public can highlight the errors in a person’s situation, and it can allow the situation to be seen in many lights. If you look at this rape case in particular, you can definitely see the errors in the situation. Brock Turner got off easy, but I hope that he will get his sentence every single day of his life. You do not get to handle anyone in the manner he did and have your parents make your case that it was just “15 minutes of action”, so people should get over it. No one gets to minimize someone else’s feeling and experiences. That’s monstrous.

The reason why I was first drawn to this particular post is because I had heard about the Brock Turner case, however, I was not fully aware of the impact that this trial had on the public and on universities campuses policies. Hence, I thought it would be interesting to learn more about this case, which raised a great amount of debates, discussions and controversy on social media.

My first reaction while reading your post was similar to the public reactions when the verdict came out; I was outraged and shocked by the lack of judgment and empathy demonstrated by the judge. Brock Turner raped an unconscious girl, she was not consented and not responsive to his actions, therefore, he should have received the same verdict than any other rapist in society, a lengthy imprisonment. I found it completely absurd that the judge dares to discuss the potential impacts that a lengthy sentence could have on Turner, he is not the victim in this case and should not be treated like one. This shows the obvious flaws of our justice system, which can show great inequality and irrationality depending of someone’s race, sex, age or social class.

This brings me to the direct relationship that your article has with my “myth of race and reality of racism” class, you raised an important point when you said that someone’s position in society as well as their skin color could influence their judgment in a trial. I completely agree with what you stated, it is evident that Turner would not have received the same treatment if he was part of a minority. He benefited from white privileges because of his social class and his skin color. This is because of the social and political advantages that often come from being white, a theory that racializes society and seriously impact non-white people lives, in this case, non-white male rapists who would have had a far more incriminating sentence than the swimmer. I also found interesting that you included statistics concerning the rate of rape in universities campuses, the numbers shows how frequent sexually abuse can occur. Your post was well written and well structured, which motivated me to read the original article. By reading about the Brock Turner case in more detail, I believe that Brock Turner should have been punished more seriously by a lengthy imprisonment, which could potentially discourage people from repeating his actions, instead of encouraging them by banalizing rape.

What drew me to this was the Brock Turner case is so controversial and popular. I can't help but think what happens when our justice system fails. I agree, sexual assault is a big issue in our college campuses. In the national guard we are constantly briefed on sexual assault in prevention. It is actually against the military code of law to not do anything in the case of rape. We are contractually and morally obligated to step in and intervene in the face of sexual assault. After I learned the Army standard for sexual assault, I have actually been in a few situations where my knowledge made a huge difference. But when that doesn't work , or the right people are not around, we have to look to the justice system to make a difference. Not all judges are the same, but this gross negligence of due diligence has to be punished. Now the only thing we can do to prevent this atrocity from happening is to inform people they can make a difference and teaching them how to step in and go to the rescue.

The Title no doubt is what brought me to click on this article. It seemed almost impossible but then you started to talk about it.
That is ridiculous that any man or women who rapes another shouldn't get many many years in prison. No matter your gender, skin color, background, family, money, or anything it shouldn't and doesn't matter they should all be treated equally with the same correct just punishment. Unfortunately I have a friend who knows someone who got raped and they cant talk about it without just breaking down completely. The person said it haunts them everyday and they cant trust anyone now and living with it in the back of your mind is the worst thing possible. To cause someone the emotional and physical trauma that they cause there victims... they should be in jail for a very very long time

What really caught my attention was the name you had for article "Rape and Release ". its just so crazy how you can do such thing and basically get away with it. Knowing that your rapist is out and free is probably one of the worst feelings you can have and i would never want anyone to have to go through that. i feel that no justice was served for this case. How do you rape someone and go to jail for only 6 months and the crazy thing is that there is more then just this case that the rapist went to jail for short period of time. Rape in college is the most common and i feel as if there should be some thing that could change this. One of my close friends experienced this and it was as if i went through it to. She never went to the authorities but every since that day she has been a different person. She was trauamatised and there was really nothing i could do but just stay by her side and help her get over it , which never happened its just a memory that won't go away haunts her till this day.

What really caught my attention was the name you had for article "Rape and Release ". its just so crazy how you can do such thing and basically get away with it. Knowing that your rapist is out and free is probably one of the worst feelings you can have and i would never want anyone to have to go through that. i feel that no justice was served for this case. How do you rape someone and go to jail for only 6 months and the crazy thing is that there is more then just this case that the rapist went to jail for short period of time. Rape in college is the most common and i feel as if there should be some thing that could change this. One of my close friends experienced this and it was as if i went through it to. She never went to the authorities but every since that day she has been a different person. She was trauamatised and there was really nothing i could do but just stay by her side and help her get over it , which never happened its just a memory that won't go away haunts her till this day.

The case of Brock Turner is heard about a lot. I feel this is due to the lax mentality of people when it comes to rape culture. The courts probably brushed it off as a mistake for Brock that or an "accident". The big controversy here as well is the idea of privilege and how it goes a long way. Had another human being that was different socially, economically, or racially speaking been in the same situation then the punishment could have been different. In certain eyes the motives of a person can change based on how they look. For Brock the way he was treated made it seem like what he did was harmless but for someone else the courts could have seen it has malicious. If he was poor or a minority his intentions then change in some people's eyes. This is bad because it leads to people that are sexually harassed, male or female, to not go to authorities because of the lack of true punishment or consequences that will come on the attacker. The school systems in my city don't really stress rape and its consequences. Instead it is brushed over in a health class while other topics get the majority of the spotlight. I feel it could help a lot to just learn more because their were a lot of people in my city that were just like Brock and might think that they can get away with harassment or don't see what they are doing as harassment until it is to late.

Right when I read the title “Rape and Release”, I knew it had to be something about Brock Turner, since People Vs. Turner is one of the biggest college rape cases going on in the country right now. I remember reading an article that estimated that the percentage of completed or attempted rape victimization among women in higher educational institutions ranged between 20% and 25% over the course of a college career. Also, for every 1,000 women attending a college or university, there are 35 incidents of rape each academic year. And Brock Turner just added another number to these statistics. I’m glad you picked this topic because it’s such a prominent event going on in society today. This is because this issue tackles two correlating topics of debate? Hence, high social privilege in society and how that affects one's punishment or in this case jail time.
I’m glad you mentioned what Emily Doe (the victim) said because “how fast he swims does not lessen the impact of what happened to me” is a perfect example of what most people thought in terms of his jail time. Just because he went to Stanford, was a good swimmer, and comes from a good background, doesn't mean what he did was any less wrong. I strongly agree with your prediction about Brock Turner as a minority and I do agree that his punishment would be a lot more severe if he didn't have the credentials mentioned above. In my opinion, he should've stayed in prison much longer than a mere six months. However, I wish their was maybe a little more about the case in general and some other examples of college rape cases around the country today. Yet, your response ended on a high note when you mentioned that it is our duty as citizens to do something about sexual assault because our loved ones could not be added to the amount of those affected by rape every day.

I read this post to read more about the Brock Turner Case. It has been in the media so often lately that I try to read as much about it as I can. I also read this post because how prevalent rape is on college campuses. The fact that he was only sentenced 6 months is disgusting to me. I think it is very unfair that he was only sentenced that amount of time and that they considered just taking away his swimming scholarship. I thought that Emily Doe's response, “how fast he swims does not lessen the impact of what happened to me", was very powerful. I think that this case changed a lot of perspectives of US citizens and created an uproar. I hope that this case will create a change in the future for victims of rape and that sexual assaulters receive the punishment they deserve and aren't let off the hook so easily. I agreed with the author of the post's thought that sexual assault could happen to anyone and if it is one of your friends or family members, you would want justice to be served, so you should want the same for other rape victims.

When I read the title “Rape and Release”, I Immediately thought about the Brock Turner Case. This is a very touchy topic to me as a young women. Equality is not being upheld. It is unfair that Brock received a short amount of jail time for the crime he committed. No man should receive 6 months of jail time for rape that is beyond ridiculous. As I was reading your post when you compared Brock turner jail time to a minority jail time and how the minority jail time would of been way lengthier, I thought about how the judicial system is very biased towards one's race. I do believe too if Brock was a minority his punishment would of been way different. A young African American man name Brian Banks was accused of rape at the age of 16 and was sentenced 5 years of jail time and 5 years of parole for being a sex offender. The accuser admitted to lying and ended up dropping the case after he did all his parole and jail time. As you can see that is a pure example of how racism still exist in the unites states and how minorities and whites are never equal to each other.

When I read the title “Rape and Release”, I Immediately thought about the Brock Turner Case. This is a very touchy topic to me as a young women. Equality is not being upheld. It is unfair that Brock received a short amount of jail time for the crime he committed. No man should receive 6 months of jail time for rape that is beyond ridiculous. As I was reading your post when you compared Brock turner jail time to a minority jail time and how the minority jail time would of been way lengthier, I thought about how the judicial system is very biased towards one's race. I do believe too if Brock was a minority his punishment would of been way different. A young African American man name Brian Banks was accused of rape at the age of 16 and was sentenced 5 years of jail time and 5 years of parole for being a sex offender. The accuser admitted to lying and ended up dropping the case after he did all his parole and jail time. As you can see that is a pure example of how racism still exist in the unites states and how minorities and whites are never equal to each other.

The summary caught my attention to this article because i was very interested to see how this man was release from prison after 6 months with what he had done. I think that because he was an athlete he is privilege to not face consequences that he deserves. This subject hits close to me having a sister that was sexual/physical abused by a man during her college time and he too only received a very small punishment, something i like to say a slap on the wrist. To me any man that can physically and sexually assault a women deserves a very bad punishment just because people like this are not right and need to learn that rape is not okay.

The summary caught my attention to this article because i was very interested to see how this man was release from prison after 6 months with what he had done. I think that because he was an athlete he is privilege to not face consequences that he deserves. This subject hits close to me having a sister that was sexual/physical abused by a man during her college time and he too only received a very small punishment, something i like to say a slap on the wrist. To me any man that can physically and sexually assault a women deserves a very bad punishment just because people like this are not right and need to learn that rape is not okay.

The title of the article was very simple yet eye-catching. With such an important topic, I feel that fancy words or phrases are not needed to draw readers in. So the simple use of alliteration was very well done. In addition to the title, I enjoyed the instructive nature of the post. Though I have heard of multiple cases of this nature, I had not heard of this specific case. Obviously I am sickened by the thought of sexual assault and this information just empowered that disgust. Growing up, I never knew that this was such a big problem or something that happened. Though this might have been ignorance. I never thought that anyone could be that cruel. Maybe it was not that common in New Hampshire or the news just glazed over it but I never really thought of sexual assault until sophomore year of high school. During my advanced biology class, we had a health and sex unit. This was discussed and has become far more prominent in the media and community. With this lack of experience, the topic has really hit me hard because it was never on my mind before.
In addition to the topic of sexual assault, the racial aspect of this post was also very interesting. Status and rank have such a high respect and can impact the most important decisions. Again, being from an area that was not quite diverse or troubled, racism or the injustice of the status system was never an issue that was visible to me. Being someone who truly doesn't understand prejudice and its causes, posts like these baffle and sadden me.

The title of the article was very simple yet eye-catching. With such an important topic, I feel that fancy words or phrases are not needed to draw readers in. So the simple use of alliteration was very well done. In addition to the title, I enjoyed the instructive nature of the post. Though I have heard of multiple cases of this nature, I had not heard of this specific case. Obviously I am sickened by the thought of sexual assault and this information just empowered that disgust. Growing up, I never knew that this was such a big problem or something that happened. Though this might have been ignorance. I never thought that anyone could be that cruel. Maybe it was not that common in New Hampshire or the news just glazed over it but I never really thought of sexual assault until sophomore year of high school. During my advanced biology class, we had a health and sex unit. This was discussed and has become far more prominent in the media and community. With this lack of experience, the topic has really hit me hard because it was never on my mind before.
In addition to the topic of sexual assault, the racial aspect of this post was also very interesting. Status and rank have such a high respect and can impact the most important decisions. Again, being from an area that was not quite diverse or troubled, racism or the injustice of the status system was never an issue that was visible to me. Being someone who truly doesn't understand prejudice and its causes, posts like these baffle and sadden me.

What drew me to this post was the title. Since it was titled “Rape and Release” I predicted it would involve and talk about Brock Turner in some way. Many citizens of this country, like me, are furious with Brock Turner’s sentence and how unbelievable short it is. I agree that if Brock were a minority the judge would not bring up the effect of prison. I couldn’t believe the judge brought this up in the first place, if someone is convicted of rape the effect of prison should not have an impact on the length of the sentence. In my opinion six months is nowhere near long enough for a Rapist to spend in jail for what they have done. Since rape is most likely one of the most important issues on college campuses I was interested in this post. Society should speak out about this issue and recognize the lack of fairness of sexual assault.

First off I would like to commend you on this well written article. Your title significantly resonated with me and really complimented the article nicely. I think we can all agree that there is an obvious form of white man privilege present in this court case. It truly amazes me how a white man can be sent to jail for a mere three months after raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster whereas only a couple years earlier a black all-star high school football player, Brian Banks, was accused of rape and was later found innocent after serving his sentence that lasted 5 years, literally 20 times longer than his white counterpart's. The judge's excuse for Turner's sentence, "Prison would have had a severe impact on him". If the most power country in the world's justice system is going to decide to charge first time offenders a three month sentence for rape, so be it, but race should NEVER have such a huge impact on a verdict this large. This example is just one of many times where privilege plays a predominantly discriminatory role in our justice system. It makes you wonder; what if a white woman raped a white man? Would her sentence be significantly shorter than if a black woman raped him? According to society's interpretation of privilege, the black woman would not only receive harsher punishment than the white woman but probably harsher punishment than the black man because of the intersectionality between her race and gender. I'm glad you wrote this article Jam20 because this really is a case that was not settled in a just way and needs to have attention brought to it. Attached you will find the whole story comparing the Turner and Banks stories and just how obvious privilege is present in our society.

https://mic.com/articles/145788/brock-turner-gets-months-in-jail-a-black...

The title of this article is what truly caught my attention! In order to further your analysis, it would be effective to explore the idea of a rape culture and the social constructs of masculinity and femininity. As proven in your article, women are often the victims of rape, and this is because of our society’s social constructs. Men are taught to be dominant, powerful and sexually active while women are taught to strive for beauty and be passive. This has lead to the portrayal of women as sexual objects all over media (i.e. advertisements, movies, videogames), therefore making them the most logical and easiest target. Additionally, rape has become so rampant in our society because of the idea of rape culture, which consists of a process through which society makes rape “not so bad”. The perfect example of this is seen within our teens, who commonly say: “I just raped you”, after defeating their friends in a game. Our society also sends false messages that rape is a rarity even though, according to this article, 20% of women are sexually assaulted during their time on a college campus. Looking at this issue through a gendered lens reveals a lot about the frequency of rape in our population. In order to have a better understanding of what rape culture is, refer to the link bellow.

http://www.wavaw.ca/what-is-rape-culture/

This article is extremely powerful, raw and truthful. The title immediately caught my attention and the content accompanying it did not disappoint. This crime is very much associable to racial discrimination and privilege, but I believe that there is also something to be said about it through a gendered lens. There is no doubt that in the past, as well as in modern society, men have had, and still have the upper hand. Since the beginning of time, men had to be virile; meaning they had to demonstrate strength in politics, military life and, of course, in their sexuality. Later in time, post sexual revolution (1960's), it was popular belief that men had to have as much sex, with as many women as possible. As this belief carried on into our modern world, the negative effects became extremely visible; it has created some sort of a rape culture. As you mentioned in your article, a lengthy prison term “would have a severe impact on [Mr.Turner].” In pitying Brock and objectifying his victim, we are normalizing rape, and therefore trivializing the gravity of his crime. So, seeing as Brock Turner is a white, heterosexual male, he lives up to the standards of an ideal man, resulting in a difference of judgement not only due to his race and sexual orientation, but also due of his gender.

I thought that this post made very clear and extremely important points. I believe this is a relevant issue for most ages and especially our age group being in college. Your title drew my attention to this post because it makes it sound like rape is being taken lightly, which it is in the example you discuss. I don't think rape should ever be taken lightly given the emotional and physical impact it has on victims. I think that Brock Turner did in fact get off lightly with only six months prison time for a rape crime. Given his social status as a student and athlete at a prestigious school caused people to think more of him and what he had to offer society and looked passed the fact that he committed a very serious crime. Being let off the hook with minor charges only worsens the issue, it lets people believe that rape is not that bad. I have a friend who has been raped before and I know that it took years for her to confess that it even happened. I can only imagine how awful it must have been for her to mentally block those moments in time out of her life. For a rape victim to come forward with their stories is a huge deal to then only have the rapist be sentenced for to jail for a short period of time. It will cause people to keep their stories bottled up and the issue will only get worse, more rapes uncovered.

I thought that this post made very clear and extremely important points. I believe this is a relevant issue for most ages and especially our age group being in college. Your title drew my attention to this post because it makes it sound like rape is being taken lightly, which it is in the example you discuss. I don't think rape should ever be taken lightly given the emotional and physical impact it has on victims. I think that Brock Turner did in fact get off lightly with only six months prison time for a rape crime. Given his social status as a student and athlete at a prestigious school caused people to think more of him and what he had to offer society and looked passed the fact that he committed a very serious crime. Being let off the hook with minor charges only worsens the issue, it lets people believe that rape is not that bad. I have a friend who has been raped before and I know that it took years for her to confess that it even happened. I can only imagine how awful it must have been for her to mentally block those moments in time out of her life. For a rape victim to come forward with their stories is a huge deal to then only have the rapist be sentenced for to jail for a short period of time. It will cause people to keep their stories bottled up and the issue will only get worse, more rapes uncovered.

I thought that this post made very clear and extremely important points. I believe this is a relevant issue for most ages and especially our age group being in college. Your title drew my attention to this post because it makes it sound like rape is being taken lightly, which it is in the example you discuss. I don't think rape should ever be taken lightly given the emotional and physical impact it has on victims. I think that Brock Turner did in fact get off lightly with only six months prison time for a rape crime. Given his social status as a student and athlete at a prestigious school caused people to think more of him and what he had to offer society and looked passed the fact that he committed a very serious crime. Being let off the hook with minor charges only worsens the issue, it lets people believe that rape is not that bad. I have a friend who has been raped before and I know that it took years for her to confess that it even happened. I can only imagine how awful it must have been for her to mentally block those moments in time out of her life. For a rape victim to come forward with their stories is a huge deal to then only have the rapist be sentenced for to jail for a short period of time. It will cause people to keep their stories bottled up and the issue will only get worse, more rapes uncovered.

The title is short and catchy, and it’s what compelled me to read this well-written article. Also, there is a strong lasting impression on the readers as you connected this dilemma with their personal lives. However, your arguments would have been more convincing by sourcing your facts. For instance, according to RAINN’s statistics, 23% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape. It’s interesting that you brought up the concept of privilege in the case of Brock Turner because that’s exactly how he got a pathetic sentence of 6 months of jail time after being convicted of rape. In fact, this is the product of the many years of perpetuating rape culture in a patriarchal society. Rape culture can be defined as downplaying the severity of the act of rape by blaming the victim, not acknowledging its frequency, objectifying women, and humanizing or pitying the perpetrators. It is clear that the judge was humanizing Brock Turner by considering his swimming skills and the removal of his swimming scholarship in his trial. As a result, it promotes the short sentences perpetrators receive and blaming the victims instead. For example, you mention that this heinous act was illegitimized because the victim was intoxicated and unconscious. To further your knowledge on the concept of rape culture, I will leave a link at the bottom that will direct you to an article by Shannon Ridgway that includes 25 everyday examples of rape culture. What’s surprising is that these examples might reflect what you see on a daily basis on the streets, at home, and even in school.

https://everydayfeminism.com/2014/03/examples-of-rape-culture/

What put things into perspective for me was when ‘jam20’, the author of the article, ending it off by connecting to the reader. Jam20 mentions how the at hand issue of rape should not be taken lightly by highlighting the fact that the victim could very well be someone that is in close relation to you.

Young women, for the longest time have more largely been the victims of rape. As mentioned in the article, “1 in 5 women and 1 in 6 men are sexually assaulted during their time on college campus”. This relevant statistic demonstrates how common this aggressive action is becoming. This reoccurring issue falls under the topic which is that of rape culture. Rape culture is a term created by American feminists in the 1970’s. It can be defined as “a complex set of beliefs that encourages male sexual aggression and supports violence against women” , “A rape culture condones physical and emotional terrorism against women as the norm” by Women Against Violence Against Women. The article speaks about an event concerning a male athlete, Brock Turner, raping Emily Doe at a frat party. The reasoning behind his decision which allowed him to think that doing so would be acceptable, was that the female was under the influence of alcohol. As Turner, along with many men who are overwhelmed with hormones and wish to conform to the man box, which tells men to be aggressive and to be hyper sexual, he committed the act of rape. Often, the victim is blamed, the perpetrators are pitied and the frequency of the crime is denied, which is exactly what happened regarding Turner’s case. Since turner went to a prestigious college, and was a promising athlete, his sentence for physically and mentally abusing Doe was simply a sentence of 6 months. Since he had such a luxurious future ahead of him, apparently it didn’t seem fair to punish him severely for ruining someone else’s life.

Turner, like most men probably didn't realize the severity of committing such an aggressive offence. Often an excuse for committing such a crime is blamed on the fact that the girl was intoxicated, or that she wasn’t wearing much clothing. Automatically, the man interpret these hidden messages as if she wants to engage with them. By assuming so and acting upon their assumptions when clear consent isn't given, is essentially rape. The act of rape negatively impacts both members involved. The girl with suffer from being physically damaged and be emotionally scared leaving her with scaring, petrifying images along with memories in her mind forever. For the man, if the women has the courage to report the offence, he will be doing jail time. When women are seen as objects to the male eye, they do not get the respect they deserve and they have to pay the consequences.

Instead of going to school in fear of being raped, students should go to school and be taught about it, bringing the subject to their attention and raising awareness. Seeing how many college rape incidents go unnoticed or students have trouble identifying it since they don't want to be seen as a so called snitch, being better educated on the subject may lead to a promising reduction of the event’s occurrence. That being said, I would encourage you to read the following article.

sources:
Susan Ervin-Tripp THE LOS,ANGELES TIMES. (1986, Dec 30). Education could help abolish rape. Toronto Star Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/435529617?accountid=41233

The title of this post really caught my eye and your writing did not disappoint! The Brock Turner case definitely angered and disappointed a lot of people, including myself. It’s important to realize that rape culture is indeed a real thing and it can be defined as everything society does that normalizes rape. For example, we see rappers and singers portraying women in a very degrading way in the lyrics of their songs. Also, high-fashion brands, as well as less known brands, have come out with advertisements that objectify women in every way possible and as more and more brands do this, it becomes normal in our society to see this in magazines or on our TV. As we try to figure out why this is happening, it’s important to consider the gender roles that have been placed on each sex. Women are expected to be submissive and obedient, whereas men are expected to dominate and have all the power. Men face the “man box”, which tells them that in order to be considered a real man, they must dominate women and men as well. Since the French Revolution, men were expected to be virile. If they weren’t, they would lose their authority, which basically means they would lose their title of being “a real man”. It seems that that is still very present in today’s society. Men dominate women (or men) when they feel like they’re being pushed out of the man box. I believe that this is a huge reason to consider when discussing rape culture and how it is dealt with. As you mentioned, Brock Turner was only sentenced to six months in prison, but got out early on good behaviour. It seems to me that the judge and many other people still see rape as something a man must do to assert his dominance over a woman. This is not acceptable because if people continue to believe this, rape culture will become more and more of a problem in our society.

If you’re interested, here is a link further explaining the man box I mentioned: http://tokiscool.blogspot.ca/2012/03/man-box.html

Hi Jam20 !
By reading your article, I felt your passionate about this topic. You have many interesting thoughts here, and the examples you provided were typical and catchy. We should all pay attentions to these problems in our society. In your article, you mentioned the former Stanford attendant, which caught my attention, because recently I have read this news as well. This is a typical example on racism and I was really angry and resentful about this judgment. It is extremely ridiculous that Brock Turner got a short jail time, just because he has a good position in society. Due to his privileges, he did not get the same punishments as other rapists get, which is unfair. As longs as they made the same mistakes, they have to take the same consequences. Otherwise, it is not only unfair to the victims, but also to the public.
In addition, I did some research on topics of rape in the campus. Over the years, many university campuses in the U.S has been paid close attention to sexual violence and discussed sex autonomy. However, these topics have been popular because this is the reality that we have to face. Also, as you mentioned, 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted during their time on college campus. According to a research in September 2015, there were 23%of all female college students received sexual abuse. Regrettably, only 15-35% of the victims reported to the police. Although rape is undoubtedly considered shameful, our society has been tolerating it all alone. Furthermore, some research has shown that rape is not only a crime, it also becomes a culture. Rape culture refers to the sexual violence as a habitual behavior. in this culture, it is not emphasized how to stop rapists, but how to prevent being raped, which is a ridiculous but serious problem in our society. This concept was first put forward in the 70's of the 20th century by feminists. In recent years, as more and more victims being brave and share their experiences, the concept of "Rape Culture" has been popular.
If you are interested in it, I would recommend this link below, which explains the "Rape Culture" in detail.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_culture

First of all, I would like to mention that your title is very catchy and that your thoughts are explained in a very powerful tone. I would like to add to your arguments on how a person’s skin color could greatly affect the verdict of any crime. Brian Banks was a promising Black High School football player. Everyone expected him to play in the National Football League. When he was 19 years old, he was accused of having raped an unconscious girl and faced a lifetime in jail. Brock Turner committed the same crime as Brian Banks but got released after serving only three months. Why is Turner’s professional career more important than Banks? Well, Brock Turner conforms perfectly to the characteristics necessary to obtain privilege in society. He is most importantly a white man, straight, rich, athletic and he displayed his sexuality by committing this crime. He portrays the traits of the man-box established by our society itself. Hence, he is able to use his unearned assets to bend the laws in his favor. He faced 14 years of jail time but got released after three months. This injustice leads people to believe that rich white men could get away with anything because they are born with privilege. Nobody is born with the right to rape another individual and should not be tolerated because of their gender or their race. Both athletes committed an irreversible crime and they both deserve to be punished accordingly.

If you are interested to learn more about Brian Banks’ case, here is the link to an article with more details: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/wrongfully-convicted-brian-ba...

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