Poverty Close to Home

by samtighe55 on December 9, 2016 - 4:03pm

Poverty Close to Home

 

Boston households under the poverty line

Total

Percent

Total

Percent

Total

Percent

 

One race

114,462

16.80%

64,278

6.30%

40,345

33.80%

White

57,086

9.60%

40,880

3.60%

12,223

29.20%

Black or African American

35,333

22.20%

11,992

7.50%

19,476

31.70%

American Indian and Alaska Native

534

41.80%

229

3.90%

297

69.40%

Asian

10,650

21.50%

7,806

16.50%

2,026

42.80%

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

29

0.00%

29

0.00%

0

-

Some other race

10,830

31.60%

3,342

11.50%

6,323

44.60%

Two or more races

5,256

22.90%

2,112

12.40%

2,123

39.10%

             

Providence households under the poverty line

           

One race

33,753

24.30%

17,077

11.20%

12,817

42.90%

White

16,864

17.40%

10,485

7.80%

4,610

37.00%

Black or African American

6,122

26.70%

2,095

12.20%

3,337

38.80%

American Indian and Alaska Native

320

47.80%

56

0.00%

264

58.00%

Asian

1,795

14.70%

1,032

5.90%

495

31.50%

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

74

44.60%

33

100.00%

41

0.00%

Some other race

8,578

37.20%

3,376

22.10%

4,070

53.80%

Two or more races

1,157

31.00%

506

8.90%

584

50.70%

 

This table above compares the poverty rates of family households under the poverty line categorized by race. The two cities are Boston and providence, two cities relatively close to each other. They were chosen because they are two of the largest cities in new England and represent most of the population. They show the same consistency in poverty rates. The figures on the right indicate all families, the figures in the middle indicate married couples, and the figures on the right indicate single parent households. This matters because these people in poverty effect everyone. Being so close to Christmas time, we all must pitch in to help these families provide for their children. It is the season of giving so looking at these numbers we are going to have to give a lot, and to everyone. The table may be categorized by race, but our support shouldn’t be.Many people have been talking about poverty and referring to minorities. This data shows that in our part of the country, whites mainly break the poverty line. It is time to stop categorizing this nations issues by race. Obviously, people are effected the same regardless of race. So even though a lesser percentage white people are suffering than other races, the total amount is sky high If people cannot put food on the table for their family, their kids feel the same kind of hunger no matter what race. This data was from the 2010 census, so even though the numbers may be different now, the difference between races is most likely the same. As you can see, the percentage of each race in poverty of a single-family home is a lot higher than households with married parents. If you look at the table you can see in some races, over half of the people in poverty are single-parent homes. So not only does the table represent a race issue, but a parental issue as well. The biggest thing we can take from this chart is that hundreds of thousands of people suffer from poverty, in the two biggest cities closest to us. We must fix this and treat everyone the same, regardless of race.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

·         2010 Poverty Census Boston MA. (2010). Retrieved from http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF

·         2010 Poverty Census Providence RI. (2010). Retrieved from http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml#

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